Contest Winner

Congratulations, Juliette Givhan! Our winner of the Making Magic Poetry Contest and featured writer in “Wondrous World”!  

“Call Me Magic” was inspired by Marcus Wicker’s collection Silencer, specifically the poem “When I’m alone in my room sometimes I stare at the wall, & in the back of my mind I hear my conscience call” which uses the title as a through line to the first stanza. While reading Wicker’s poem, I kept returning to one idea: I have been called many things by many people (friend, student, love, menace) but I have rarely claimed a title for myself. “Call Me Magic” is my attempt to change that- a long overdue self-naming that I saw happening in Wicker’s work. My poem is a spill of who I see myself as, and a reminder to give myself more credit for managing the multitudes that come with the different parts of my identity. – Juliette Givhan

Juliette Givhan (she/they received an MFA from Oregon State University and writes predominantly about myths and memes. A lover of thicc cats, overpriced seasonal coffees, and out of vogue video games- she WILL make a scene for a breakfast bagel. Their recent work appears in McSweeny‘s, stellium literary magazine, and DEAR Poetry magazine.

See more on on Juliette’s website: https://givhanj00.wixsite.com/juliette-the-poet

Thursday Inspiration

Virago

Petrichor wafted into her beaten lungs.

Nourishing the forest within.

Rain stroked her bruised skin.

Filling the droughted river.

Psithurism played her favorite tune.

Dancing with extravagant grace.

Wind carried her elegant locks.

Praising her every perfection.

She flew beyond the forbidden skies,

And saw her distant past.

The scars on her body illuminate.

The wars she fought, a clean slate.

She designs a path,

and opens the gate to the never-ending.

My name is Malavika Saju. I was born in India but lived most of my life in Africa. I moved to Dubai 6 years ago for my education. I am currently a first year University student. I have been an avid poem writer for the last three years but have had one piece of work published. I am a business student, but I find that poetry and literature play a major role in my passions and the ways I express myself. I look forward to my work being reviewed and possibly published.

Follow Malavika Saju on Instagram @malavika_saju

Coffee tip:

When shopping for coffee, keep in mind light roast beans hold more caffeine than dark roast. But, if you desire a bolder flavor, dark roast is a better choice!

Drinking Up Tuesday

WOODEN GODDESS

You don’t know me

but stare at my hard, brown belly

as if it were my brain

mocking you

As I stand guard

on your shelf from night’s yawn

till morning winks a billion blinks

pile up dust shawls over my wooden skin

You might fear or revere

my definitive demeanor

my resolve, the way space must

curve and arch

Around my impossible beauty

But stop, please

each day and

hear the music

I have soaked

from my roots to yours

It resounds in bold buttery

waves over oceans

and through guitar strings

to the umbilical where life crawled

from that mysterious mother

who carried your love

Tamra Plotnick’s poetry and prose works have been published in many journals and anthologies, including: Serving House Journal; The Waiting Room Reader, Global City Review and The Coachella Review. Her poetry collection In the Zero of Sky is forthcoming from Assure Press. She has performed her work in multimedia shows at a range of venues in New York City where she lives. She dances samba and raqs sharki, teaches high school, and lingers with friends and family when not writing poetry.

Learn more about Tamra at

tamraplotnick.net and assurepress.org/tamraplotnick

Coffee tip:

What do you do with that last half cup of coffee left in the kettle? Do you save it? Do you let it go cold? Or, do you guzzle it down? Did you know that house plants can use the nutrients in coffee? Instead of dumping the last little bit of the caffeinated goodness down the drain, try watering a plant instead. The nitrates give our little green friends an extra boost of nutrients they often lack from just water.